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Author Topic: Steering stem socket  (Read 7241 times)
aviationfred
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« on: May 12, 2017, 02:36:58 PM »

With the viral thread about the steering stem acorn nut and anti-seize. I thought I would share a new tool that I purchased to give an accurate torque for the actual steering stem nut.


Here is the eBay link that I ordered the part from.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/121805984442?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


Fred
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2017, 04:32:25 PM »

With the viral thread about the steering stem acorn nut and anti-seize. I thought I would share a new tool that I purchased to give an accurate torque for the actual steering stem nut.


Here is the eBay link that I ordered the part from.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/121805984442?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


Fred


Well looky there: I just found my next machining project.....LOL!
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racerrad8
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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2017, 04:49:05 PM »

Yamaha makes a specific wrench for this purpose. The torque value listed in the GYSM is using this wrench: Yamaha Steering Stem Wrench


Since the torque value provided in the GYSM uses this tool and the square drive is not centered the same torque valve should not be used for the center drive socket.

The torque value of the socket is unknown, but could possibly calculated based on the distance from the center line to the square drive point.

Randy - RPM

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Randy - RPM
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2017, 05:13:38 PM »

If the distance from the center of the nut to the center of the square drive hole is known, then the torque can calculated. But you would need to measure that distance with the wrench on the nut, being that the wrench is adjustable for different size fasteners. The Yamaha wrench becomes a multiplier, so if the value in the GYSM  depends on this wrench, then the socket tool will need a higher torque value since it is measured without the multiplier.
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2017, 05:28:39 PM »

Yamaha makes a specific wrench for this purpose. The torque value listed in the GYSM is using this wrench: Yamaha Steering Stem WrenchSince the torque value provided in the GYSM uses this tool and the square drive is not centered the same torque valve should not be used for the center drive socket.The torque value of the socket is unknown, but could possibly calculated based on the distance from the center line to the square drive point.
Randy - RPM
Randy,

If the torque wrench is applied parallel to the Yamaha wrench handle, then no, the toque value printed would not be the torque value applied to the nut.
If the torque wrench is applied at 90 degrees to the Yamaha wrench handle, it appears that the torque value given would be the torque value applied to the nut, or very close to the printed value.  This 90 degree angle is especially important when using a ratchet-style torque wrench.  I do not have a FSM, but that is what I'd expect to see.
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FJ_Hooligan
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2017, 05:37:08 PM »

I'll just stick with my Channel-Lock pliers.
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DavidR.
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bono malum superate


« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2017, 06:48:20 PM »

If the torque wrench is applied parallel to the Yamaha wrench handle, then no, the toque value printed would not be the torque value applied to the nut.
If the torque wrench is applied at 90 degrees to the Yamaha wrench handle, it appears that the torque value given would be the torque value applied to the nut, or very close to the printed value.  This 90 degree angle is especially important when using a ratchet-style torque wrench.  I do not have a FSM, but that is what I'd expect to see.
The issue Randy mentions is that the Yamaha wrench is being replaced by a socket. The YamWrench is a multiplier with the 3/8" hole for the torque wrench a distance away from the center of applied torque. Take that away (torque directly on the center of the nut) and you need a corrected torque value.
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PaulG
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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2017, 11:06:37 PM »

If the distance from the center of the nut to the center of the square drive hole is known, then the torque can calculated. But you would need to measure that distance with the wrench on the nut, being that the wrench is adjustable for different size fasteners. The Yamaha wrench becomes a multiplier, so if the value in the GYSM  depends on this wrench, then the socket tool will need a higher torque value since it is measured without the multiplier.

 scratch_one-s_head  That sounds just like:
"Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.
                The Duchess - Alice In Wonderland
wacko2

Took me as long to understand that as it did to find that quote.....  pardon

To paraphrase another quote... Mine is not to reason why,  unknown just read the instructions and turn the wrench.   bye2
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2017, 07:13:32 PM »

http://www.cncexpo.com/TorqueAdapter.aspx

Try the above.
Anson
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« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2017, 01:00:23 PM »

This thread reminds me of a Danny Kaye film........................

The pellet with the poison's in the vessel with the pestle; the chalice from the palace has the brew that is true! Right?
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Mark Olson
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« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2017, 01:05:42 AM »

This stem nut torque discussion has been going on over 10 years that I can recall back to the old Yahoo forum days.

a small chain pipe wrench that uses a socket wrench to turn it will suffice. It mimics the yamaha tool quite well.

Harbor freight for 8 bucks.

If I say use the" bounce test" Noel is gonna lose it.  so don't ask.
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Mark O.
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jahearne
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2019, 04:43:36 PM »

Yamaha makes a specific wrench for this purpose. The torque value listed in the GYSM is using this wrench: Yamaha Steering Stem Wrench


Since the torque value provided in the GYSM uses this tool and the square drive is not centered the same torque valve should not be used for the center drive socket.

The torque value of the socket is unknown, but could possibly calculated based on the distance from the center line to the square drive point.

Randy - RPM



Randy,

Any chance of putting together a rental tool kit for front-end work? This tool, plus the 27mm socket, the fork damper rod tool, and fork seal driver?

Thanks,
John
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John Ahearne
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« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2019, 04:47:44 PM »

Randy,

Any chance of putting together a rental tool kit for front-end work? This tool, plus the 27mm socket, the fork damper rod tool, and fork seal driver?

Thanks,
John

John, I'll talk it over with my dad next week. I am nit sure if we ever gave that any thought to build that kit. But, I like the idea.
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