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Author Topic: The story of Fj1200 '86 maintenance and an ongoing learning experience  (Read 200 times)
fj316
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Location: Trondheim, Norway
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« on: July 31, 2022, 06:32:38 AM »

Last year my cousin was taking his motorcycle license and needed some additional practice driving. And seeing as my old FJ1100 was (and still is) not in the best of shapes I needed something a bit more reliable to be able to help him pass his final test. First I looked at an VFR750 that at first glance seemed to be all right, but gave a rattling sound from the engine when the clutch was engaged/pumped even while standing still. So naturally I apologized for not being able to buy the bike in good conscience and continued my search. Found a fairly affordable FJ1200 that looked all right and had no indications of larger faults apart from "the usual" clutch engagement problems, a little oil seepage and some slight gas dripping.





I initially gave it an oil change, swapped out a pretty worn clutch slave and checked that the rest of the clutch was all right. The oil seepage was fixed with a "simple" change of the valve cover gasket in addition to the bolt gaskets. The rubber was completely hardened in some places and was way overdue for a swap.





The brake calipers were also overhauled as the front ones were stuck. Here I learned another valuable lesson as the rotor kept grinding on the caliper edge with no aparent misalignment of the front wheel. Turns out I had torqued it too hard and when I invested in a suitable torque key and adjusted to spec the front rotor was clear of the caliper.

The petcock was another issue entirely and I should have checked it sooner as it started leaking pretty hard after a longer practice session. So the tank had to be taken off and looked over. The elbow coupling was completely loose in the petcock and not safety wired. So I was basically lucky I didn't end up with a toasted bike. And can only reiterate what others have said that a safety wiring is paramount to a safe ride and operation. I tried with some gasket silicone first that didn't take and ended up epoxying the elbow coupling and safety wiring it in place. No pictures of that unfortunately though. There was however no more drip and the bike lasted the rest of the season without incident.

My cousin and his friend both passed their drivers test but alas they did not join this years (2022) motorcycle parade on our national holiday the 17th of may.



All however was not sunshine and roses as the bike had been stored outside the previous winter (lesson learned and paid storage seems to be a sensible option going forward). It started and ran a bit rough in april but got better after some fresh gas and some revs on the highway. But during the summer the symptoms of a rough 2-3K RPM became worse and the bike eventually gave up on a test run early in july of this year and had to spend the night on the parking lot of my workplace after a shameful waddle the last couple of hundred meters sorry

This forum was helpful as ever though and there is still hope that I might be able to ride again before winter once I can overcome the present day challenge and rite of passage of a carburettor overhaul that will be documented further with accompanying pictures in this thread.
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Old Rider
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2022, 01:02:17 PM »

Hello and welcome Nice to se some other Norwegian poeple in here.God luck with the carb ovehaul !
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fj316
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2022, 10:07:51 AM »

Thank you for the well wishes Old Rider. I'm indeed gonna need some God luck if the bike is gonna be back on the road this season. But I have faith that it will ride again. It's just that time and resources aren't totally on my side now that summer is waning and work has started back up.

On a more positive note a pair of fresh tires were added to the bike so now there is all the more reason to get it back to kookaloo town again.



But the carb project seems to be a bit more of a challenge than initially expected. The diaphragms once inspected all had one or more pinholes and look like they are done and done...



I ordered some loose ones and will do the old dull end of a butterknife trick to get them fitted. And the trick of a spring loaded punch to get the pin out of the floats was golden!



Now all that remains is to remove the rust crud that when inspecting one of the T couplings between the carbs seems to be originating from the tank itself. So I'll just keep on disassembling and bagging the tiny parts in marked ziplocs so that they aren't lost and that I can reassemble it in due course. I am acutely aware of eye protection while doing the cleaning especially on the carb bodies and with sprays. But if anyone has any other tips for "easy" cleaning both of bodies and parts and how thorough I need to be when disassembling I'd appreciate it. Both in method and in cleaning medium. For now my aim is to unscrew any screws and get the floats off while leaving anything that is press fitted and in brass well alone and to use brake cleaner as my solvent.
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